Cancer

References for BRCA1/BRCA2 article

Tumor Genetic Testing References for BRCA1/BRCA2 articleAl Bakir M, Gabra H. The molecular genetics of hereditary and sporadic ovarian cancer: implications for the future. Br Med Bull. 2014 Dec;112(1):57-69. Baretta Z, Mocellin S, Goldin E, Olopade OI, Huo D. Effect of BRCA germline mutations on breast cancer prognosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Medicine (Baltimore).

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Current strategies in BRCA1/BRCA2 molecular testing

Tumor Genetic Testing Summary We summarize here strategies to adopt when testing individuals for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations based on positive or negative family history. Any comments or personal experiences are welcome in the comments section. For an introduction on the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, you can read our BRCA1 and BRCA2 deep dive page here or our clinical card on hereditary

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BRCA1 and BRCA2: the mutational spectrum

Tumor Genetic Testing Thousands of sequence variants have been so far identified in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes through the analysis of breast cancer families and population-based case studies. A total of 19.655 different mutations and polymorphisms are reported in the BRCA1 gene by dal BRCA Exchange, whereas the same database reports 20.734 unique mutations

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BRCA1, BRCA2 and their products

Tumor Genetic Testing BRCA1, BRCA2 and their productsBoth BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in maintenance of genome stability, as they are crucial for the process of DNA repair by homologous recombination (HRR), which is considered to be a conservative form of DNA repair, largely involved in repairing DNA lesions that stall DNA replication forks and/or

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Current methods for BRCA1/BRCA2 molecular analysis

Current Methods for BRCA1/BRCA2 molecular analysis BRCA testing is commonly performed by direct Sanger sequencing. This method is considered the ‘gold standard’ of DNA sequencing. It is technologically reliable, widely available, and has a relatively simple workflow. The drawbacks of Sanger sequencing are: • limited throughput • lower cost-effectiveness compared to next-generation sequencing (NGS) •

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BRCA1/BRCA2 related cancers

Tumor Genetic Testing Breast Cancer In women, breast cancer accounts for 15% of cancer-related deaths. 10% of women affected by breast cancer have a family history of the disease. Compared with women without a family history, women with one first-degree relative with premenopausal breast cancer are at 3.3-fold greater risk, and women with two first-degree

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BRCA1 and BRCA2: deep dive!

Tumor Genetic Testing Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes result in a high increased lifetime risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer and, to a lesser extent, other types of cancer such as prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer and melanoma. BRCA1 and BRCA2 related susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer (also known as hereditary cancer and ovarian syndrome)

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Driver mutations

Mutations in cancer development: drivers and passengers Those genetic mutations that drive the development of cancer are defined as driver mutations. Driver mutations allow cancer to grow and invade the human body. Several genetic mutations are found in cancer cells, however just a few can be classified as drivers. All other mutations, which play just a secondary role

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Gliomas

THE BIOMARKERS Glioma is the most frequent tumor of the central nervous system in adults. Mutations in IDH genes (IDH1 and IHD2) can be found in more than 70% of low-grade gliomas and in some instances of glioblastoma. As the most frequent mutation, IDH1 Arg132His (also known as R132H) has been served as a predictive marker

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Gastric cancer

HEREDITARY AND SPORADIC: THE GENETICS Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. In addition to gastric cancer, up to 60% of female mutation carriers develop lobular carcinoma of the breast, and some carriers may develop colorectal cancer. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC) are caused by heterozygous

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Colon cancer

Recommended panel testing at Breda Genetics for this condition: Colon & gastric cancer, with/without polyposis (APC, BMPR1A, CDH1, MLH1, MLH3, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, PMS1, PMS2, PTEN, SMAD4, STK11, EPCAM) Summary Genetic mutations have been identified as the cause of inherited cancer risk in some colon cancers; these mutations are estimated to account for only 5-6 % of colorectal cancer

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